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Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Lifts for Short Leg

Dr. Blake-

I saw your posting regarding athletes and how if they have a leg length discrepency they should consider a full length foot lift as opposed to a heel lift.  I would like to know where I can buy a full length foot lift that is as flexible as the one you show in your pictures.  I have recently purchased one of the Clearly Adjustable full length lifts, but find it to be extremely ridgid.  I think a more fleixble lift would be more practical for being on my feet a lot.  I used to enjoy working several times a week until a recent possible hip injury.  I was diagnosed with a leg length difference of at least 6mm and have used a heel lift for several years.  I am hoping that trying a full length lift will possibly even out an imbalances in my hips and weight bearing on my feet.  Any help from you on sources to purchase these items would be great!  Thanks!

Jeanne (name changed to protect)

Dear Jeanne, Thanks for your email and sorry for my delay. The material I use is call grinding rubber and you can purchase several 1/8th inch sheets from www.jmsplastics.com. The trickiest part is to skive the leading edge, but try angling the scissors. You can also use 1/8th inch spenco flat insoles and cut out the toes to give more room. Use one pair and you can make a 1/4th inch lift for one side (almost 6 mm). These can be purchased all over. Sure hope this helps you. 

Here the black side of a Spenco insole with the toe part cut out is being compared to a typical heel lift.

Here Grinding Rubber from JMS Plastics is being formed into a full length lift and a heel lift.

Here a Spenco insole is being used as a lift of the short left side and an accommodation for a painful big toe joint. 

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Thank you very much for leaving a comment. Due to my time restraints, some comments may not be answered.I will answer questions that I feel will help the community as a whole.. I can only answer medical questions in a general form. No specific answers can be given. Please consult a podiatrist, therapist, orthopedist, or sports medicine physician in your area for specific questions.