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Saturday, February 11, 2012

Plantar Fasciitis and The Role of Flip Flops




PM News

CA Podiatrist Discusses Plantar Fasciitis
Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the fibrous tissue that connects the heel bone to the metatarsal bones on the bottom of the foot. Symptoms can include a burning sensation and aching on the soles, and dull or sharp heel pain. "If, first thing in the morning, your heel is really painful, and then as you walk around it feels better, that is the classic sign," says Sheryl Strich, DPM, president of the American Association for Women Podiatrists.
Dr. Sheryl Strich
Surprise: "High heels are not the evil-doer," says Dr. Strich. The most likely culprits are pancake-soled shoes with zero arch support, such as flip-flops, ballet flats, and some casual sneakers. And standing for long periods of time in any shoe -- say, if you work on your feet -- can also cause this common injury.
Source: Ladies' Home Journal




Below are several youtube videos on plantar fasciitis stretches and treatments.








2 comments:

  1. It seems short-sighted to say that flip flops and flat shoes with no arch support are the culprit for plantar fasciatis. If you wear arch supports and traditional thick soled shoes all year long, your plantar fascia is going to be much weaker because it is not getting stressed as much. Then when summer comes along, you switch to flip flops and now your plantar fascia has to work overtime and you get plantar fasciatis. So what really is the culrpit; not flip flops....

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    Replies
    1. So, why is it that patients with plantar fasciitis get orthotics and do better, and have much more pain wearing flip flops or other non supportive shoes. See the plantar fascia is actually a ligament and can not get strong. It can become tight by not being stretched (in orthotics) or being over stretched in ball of the foot loading exercises or non supportive shoes allowing the arch to collapse and strain. The plantar fascia is the 3rd support system to the arch, and you should keep your arch muscles (2nd support to the arch) strong with 3-4 minutes a day of exercises. Strengthening of any tissue like the plantar arch muscles takes only a few minutes every day, this is why it is very easy to strain those muscles, weaken them and then put too much stress on the plantar fascia. Hope this makes some sense. Dr Rich Blake

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Thank you very much for leaving a comment. Due to my time restraints, some comments may not be answered.I will answer questions that I feel will help the community as a whole.. I can only answer medical questions in a general form. No specific answers can be given. Please consult a podiatrist, therapist, orthopedist, or sports medicine physician in your area for specific questions.