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Monday, February 18, 2019

CRPS following foot injury: Email Advice

Hello I’m recovering from two tendons and stress fractures in both my sesamoids.  I’ve also been diagnosed with CRPS which for me involves significant swelling and temperature changes in my left foot.  I’ve finished almost four months of immobilization and am starting to walk around in my insoles and orthopedic shoes.  My foot turns hot and cold though.  The injections I received for CRPS seemed to have resulted in little change in these symptoms.  Walking starts to really hurt after not too long and I fear I’m damaging my sesamoids again.  is there any way to tell?   How much pain do you have when you start walking and how long does it last?  Should you just stay off of it longer?  Any thoughts on CRPS?  Also what are your thoughts on other treatment modalities to boost recovery?  What about prolozone injections?  PEMF?  I have a bone stimulator.  Thanks


Dr. Blake's comment: CRPS is a complication from chronic pain or an acute injury. The changes in your foot is called vasomotor insufficiency and could mean that the tissue is not getting enough blood to heal. Typically sympathetic blocks and oral meds can help considerably. Do you know what type of shot you got? Movement is crucial, as the immobilization is terrible for CRPS. Make sure the sesamoids are protected with orthotics and dancer's pads, and you will have to tell me what tendons you hurt. But, they should be protected with taping and bracing if possible to decrease the pull of the tendons. If you can start contrast bathes at 1 minute hot (100 F) and 1 minute cold (60 F) for 20 minutes with it feeling better, try it since it is a great way to get the circulation moving. Acupuncture is also helpful. See if there are any neuro physical therapists in your area to consult. Your team should be podiatrist or foot orthopedist, neuro physical therapist, acupuncturist, and pain specialist to do the sympathetic blocks and prescribe oral meds to calm nerves down like Lyrica and Cymbalta and nortryptyline. Get the foot and ankle moving as much as you can without flaring it up. Consider the Curable app and NOI flash cards. Consider Quell (I think that there is some money back guarantee). If you can get Calmare treatments, that would be great. Tons of things to do.  Hope this helps some. Rich

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Thank you very much for leaving a comment. Due to my time restraints, some comments may not be answered.I will answer questions that I feel will help the community as a whole.. I can only answer medical questions in a general form. No specific answers can be given. Please consult a podiatrist, therapist, orthopedist, or sports medicine physician in your area for specific questions.