Total Pageviews

Pay Pal Donation




Please consider a donation if you feel the blog has helped you. A $5 donation will help me pay for the blog artwork, guest writers, etc. $100 has been donated in June 2017. I am very honored and grateful. Dr Rich Blake

Followers

Dr Blake's Book to Learn the Secrets of successfully helping your problems

I would love you to consider purchasing my book from Book Baby publishing. The printed book goes for $79.95, but the ebook is now available for $4.99. I hope it helps many people. Thank you. Rich


https://store.bookbaby.com/book/Secrets-to-Keep-Moving-A-Guide-from-a-Podiatrist (eBook)

https://store.bookbaby.com/book/Secrets-to-Keep-Moving-A-Guide-from-a-Podiatrist1 (print)

Book image not available.

Translate

Monday, February 15, 2016

Post Sesamoidectomy

Hello again dr Blake!

At 10 months after tibial sesamoidectomy I'm happy to report some progress. There has ben no severe flare-ups since November. I have been able to do all my daily activities pain free (working, even standing for up to eight hours in the OR, shopping, walking to the store etc) and have noticed that I've gained back my usual, quite fast walking pace. I've also started the walk-run program, and progressed up to 3 minutes of running but at that point there was some pain again so now I've got to start over at 2 minutes. Somehow, running seems a lot worse for me than walking, even though I have a thicker dancer's pad while doing that. The winter weather has been very crappy (pardon me) this year, and I've not tried cycling yet. It's a hobby I used to love and I'm anxious about not being able to do that again.
I'm happy about living pain free now, but still I long for the long hikes and cycle rides I used to do... Should I just forget about those now and find other hobbies? Can I still expect progress this long after the surgery?
Dr Blake's comment: Definitely, as you gradually stress the joint, the scar tissue will become more normal, and the body's own neurological protection will lessen (less sensitiivity). Hope you are continuing to ice twice daily to keep the inflammation down, even on relative non-exercise days. Making sure the biomechanical support and off weighting is correct is crucial in the Walk Run Program (link below). Thanks for inspiring others with a similar situation. It is typically a 2 year post op course. 
I'm contemplating about getting PT to analyze if my gait is stressing the sesamoids too much, and also to guide with some exercises for the foot. It's hard to find the time for rehabilitating the foot with my busy schedule and now that I'm pain free on 90% of the days, I just kind of forget about it...

Wishing you a lot of sunshine in the coming spring!

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thank you very much for leaving a comment. Due to my time restraints, some comments may not be answered.I will answer questions that I feel will help the community as a whole.. I can only answer medical questions in a general form. No specific answers can be given. Please consult a podiatrist, therapist, orthopedist, or sports medicine physician in your area for specific questions.