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Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Iliotibial Band Tendinitis: 3 Common Stretches




The above video demonstrates the 3 common iliotibial band stretches I show patients suffering from this common running injury. It is almost rare in other sports, since it is a repetitive stress syndrome where the ilio tibial band rubs over either the greater trochanter of the femur at the hip or the lateral femoral epicondyle on the outside of the knee. Women are more prone for hip IT Band pain, and men more prone for knee IT Band pain. The stretches should be done 2 sets of 30 second count/5 deep breathes, and 5 to 10 times per day. Many runners can feel it coming on (called prodrome symptoms) and can stretch it out before the pain gets too intense. I had one patient who would feel it around 2 miles into a run, and was able to finish the Tahiti Marathon by stopping every 2 miles to stretch out the band. Most of the time however, subsequent stretches gives less time running (diminishing returns). The ethafoam roller can be used each morning and evening to elongate the fibers. Never use the roller over the boney prominences at the hip or knee. If stretching ever increases the pain, stop immediately and consult with your health care provider. You may have bursitis, nerve pain, hip joint pain, or a stress fracture. For normal ilio tibial band tendinitis, the stretching is a very relaxing exercise and the symptoms feel better (at least temporarily).

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Thank you very much for leaving a comment. Due to my time restraints, some comments may not be answered.I will answer questions that I feel will help the community as a whole.. I can only answer medical questions in a general form. No specific answers can be given. Please consult a podiatrist, therapist, orthopedist, or sports medicine physician in your area for specific questions.