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Thursday, December 30, 2010

Top 100 Biomechanical Guidelines #35: Use Common Shock Absorption Modifications Routinely

Patients, with or without orthotic devices, should never feel that they do not have hope at a soft comfortable impact against the ground. There are so many products out there for dampening shock, and these products are used in many imaginative ways. Here 3 commonly utilized products for shock absorption are demonstated: gel, spenco, and plastazote. They definitely should be part of every shoe/orthotic program, at least in some form or another. I am showing here how I commonly use these 3 products, but there are many acceptable variations. The goal is that the patient feels supportive, but cushioned. Too much cushion however can make a patient more unstable, so there must be a good balance between cushion and stability.

Plastazote Foam Material - 1/8'' x 6'' x 1 yd. (3.2m x 15cm x 91cm), 1 Roll
One of the most important aspects of designing a good orthotic device is shock absorption. Here adhesive back gel sheets are attached to the heel area of orthotics to help with shock absorption while utilizing a plastic orthotic device for maximal stability. Normally 1/8inch gel is utilized, but up to 1/4inch can be used.
Spenco is the best shock absorption material as an insert or orthotic cover. Here, a knockoff spenco, is being used. The original Spenco is still the best and is always in green.

Pink, or #1, plastazote is the memory foam used as the top layer in a Hannaford custom made orthotic device. Here it used as a forefoot extension on an orthotic device in 1/4". I commonly use 1/8" as a full length top cover on an orthotic device.

http://store.acor.com/products/Plastazote%C2%AE-Polyethylene-Foam-%252d-RETAIL.html

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Thank you very much for leaving a comment. Due to my time restraints, some comments may not be answered.I will answer questions that I feel will help the community as a whole.. I can only answer medical questions in a general form. No specific answers can be given. Please consult a podiatrist, therapist, orthopedist, or sports medicine physician in your area for specific questions.