Total Pageviews

Pay Pal Donation




Please consider a donation if you feel the blog has helped you. A $5 donation will help me pay for the blog artwork, guest writers, etc. $90 has been donated in August 2017. I am very honored and grateful. Dr Rich Blake

Followers

Dr Blake's Book

Translate

Sunday, April 1, 2012

Hallux Rigidus: Patient with Recent Surgery

Dr. Blake, I have had this condition for over 15 years.

 I started with orthotics and limited high heel use,

 then tried anti inflammatory meds, 

then no heels and limited activity based on irritation.

 I have also had acupuncture and cold laser with a 

chiropractor-both very effective. This whole time

 i have Taken glucosomine chondroitin as well because

 i figured it couldn't hurt. I'm now 42 and just broke down

 and had surgery, but just to clean up the joint.

 My podiatrist was pleased with the surgery and said

 I had one small spot without cartilage, but for the most part

 it cleaned up nicely. It has been 8 days and I am

 feeling like my recovery is going well.

 I found your website because I was looking for

 some exercises I can do to help with the recovery.

 My doctor was going to give me some when

 I get the stitches out this week, but I

 would love to have your opinion as well. I really want

 to get back into walking, running and playing tennis.

 I really like my doctor(after having seen several

 doctors over the years) and feel this was the

 right time for surgery (especially after

 reading your blogs!) before I was limited to

 joint replacement or fusion. However he is

 not requiring physical therapy, just exercises to

 do on my own. Should I see a physical therapist 

after my surgery? Thanks so much for putting

 this information out there!

1 comment:

  1. Kim, Thanks for the kind words and comments. The surgeon is in charge of your wound until you are discharged post surgery, which is normally around 3 months. Physical Therapists need to work closely with the surgeon to know what they can and can not do. The areas that the physical therapist could help you are gait training, foot strengthening, foot taping, foot range of motion, surgical scar reduction, anti-inflammatory measures, foot inserts if the surgeon does not have expertise in them, etc. I love to have a physical therapist who wants to work with feet and the challenges of walking on something that has just been operated on work on these areas. Have a nice talk with the doc and see if he knows a good foot physical therapist. Normally patients go 2 times per week for 10 weeks, so a lot can get accomplished. Dr Rich Blake

    ReplyDelete

Thank you very much for leaving a comment. Due to my time restraints, some comments may not be answered.I will answer questions that I feel will help the community as a whole.. I can only answer medical questions in a general form. No specific answers can be given. Please consult a podiatrist, therapist, orthopedist, or sports medicine physician in your area for specific questions.